January 16, 2003

THE TRIP TO ENGLAND IN 1874. 25

Mr. Spalding made an effort to introduce base ball in England in 1874,
but the experiment proved to be a costly one financially, and it did not
result favorably in popularizing the American game in England. The two
teams who visited England in July, 1874, included the following players of
the Boston and Athletic clubs of that year:

BOSTON. POSITIONS. ATHLETIC.
-------------------------------------------------
James White Catcher James E. Clapp.
A.G. Spalding Pitcher James D. McBride.
James O'Rourke First Base West D. Fisler.
Ross C. Barnes Second Base Joseph Battin.
Henry Shafer Third Base Edward B. Sutton.
George Wright Short Stop M.H. McGeary.
And. J. Leonard Left Field Albert W. Gedney.
Harry Wright Center Field James F. McMullen.
Col. C. McVey Right Field A.C. Arisen.
George W. Hall Substitute Al. J. Reach.
Thomas L. Beals Substitute J.P. Sensenderfer.
Sam Wright, Jr Substitute Thomas Murnan.[A]

[**Proofreaders note A: "Murnan" might be a typo, as it appears as
"Murnam" later on the page.]

The record of the games played in England on the trip is as follows:

DATE. |CONTESTING CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |SCORES.
-------+-------------------+----------+----------+-------
July 30|Athletic vs. Boston|Liverpool |McBride, |
| | |Spalding |
| | |10in. | 14-11
" 31|Boston vs. Athletic| " |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 23-18
Aug. 1 |Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 13-12
" 3 |Boston vs. Athletic|London |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 24-7
" 6 | " " " | " |Spalding, |
| | |McMullen | 14-11
" 8 |Athletic vs. Boston|Richmond |McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 11-3
" 10|Boston vs. Athletic|Crystal |Spalding, |
| | Pal. |McBride | 17-8
" 11|Athletic vs. Boston| " |McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 19-8
" 13|Boston vs. Athletic|Kensington|Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 16-6
" 14|Spalding's Nine vs.| " |Spalding, |
|McMullen's Nine | |McMullen | 14-11
" 15|Boston vs. Athletic|Sheffield | " , " | 19-8
" 17| " " " | " | " , " | 18-17
" 20|Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride, |
| | |Spalding | 7-2
" 24|Boston vs. Athletic|Dublin |Spalding, |
| | |McBride | 12-7
" 25|Athletic vs. Boston| " |McMullen, |
| | |H. Wright | 13-4

Boston victories 8, Athletic victories 6.

In the percentage of base hits of those who played in a majority of the
games on the Boston side McVey led with .435, Leonard being second, with
.418, and George Hall third, with .364, Barnes, O'Rourke, Schafer, Harry
and George Wright and Spalding following in order. On the Athletic side
Anson led with .437, McGeary being second, with .388, and McMullen third,
with .367. McBride, Clapp, Murnam, Sutter, Gedner and Battin following in
order, the latter having a percentage of .323. Sensenderfer only played in
9 games, Kent in 8, Fisler in 5, and Beals in 4. All the others played in
10 games and over.

In the description of the players of the team given in the London papers
at the time of their visit the following paragraph appeared, quoted from
Mr. Chadwick's comments in the _Clipper_:

"Spalding is justly regarded as one of the most successful of the
strategic class of pitchers. In judgment, command of the ball, pluck,
endurance, and nerve, in his position he has no superior; while his
education and gentlemanly qualities place him above the generality of base-
ball pitchers. As a batsman he now equals the best of what are called
'scientific' batsmen--men who use their heads more than their muscle in
handling the ash. His force in delivery is the success with which he
disguises a change of pace from swift to medium, a great essential in
successful pitching. Spalding is a thorough representative of the spirited
young men of the Western States, he being from Illinois."

Of George Wright the same writer said: "George Wright is generally
regarded as a model base-ball player, especially in his responsible
position of short-stop; and until he injured his leg he had no equal in
the position. He is a jolly, good-natured youth full of life and spirit,
up to all the dodges of the game, and especially is he noted for his sure
catching of high balls in the infield, and for his swift and accurate
throwing. At the bat, too, he excels; while as a bowler, fielder, and
batsman, in cricket, he ranks with the best of American cricketers. He
comes of real old English stock, his father being a veteran English
cricketer, and formerly the professional of the St. George Cricket Club of
New York."

Besides the base-ball matches played during the tour, the following table
shows what the two clubs combined did on the cricket field, against the
strongest players of London, Sheffield, Manchester and Dublin. The sides
in each contest were eighteen Americans against twelve British cricketers:

|AMERICANS vs. |AMERICANS. |OPPONENTS.
-----------+-------------------+----------------+------------
| |1st.|2d. |Total|1st.|2d. ||Total
-----------+-------------------+----+----+-----+----+----++------
Aug. 3,4 |12 Marylebone | 107| ---| 107 | 105| ---|| 105
|Club on Ground at | | | | | ||
|Lords | | | | | ||
Aug. 6,7 |11 Prince's C. C. | 110| ---| 110 | 21| 39|| 60
|at Prince's | | | | | ||
Aug. 8 |13 Richmond C at | 45| ---| 45 | 108| ---|| 108
|Richmond[1] | | | | | ||
Aug. 13,14 |11 Surrey C. S. at | 100| 111| 211 | 27| 2|| 29
|Ovalt[2] | | | | | ||
Aug. 15,17 |12 Sheffield, at | 130| ---| 130 | 43| 45|| 88
|Sheffield | | | | | ||
Aug. 20, 21|11 Manchester, at | 121| 100| 221 | 42| 53|| 95
|Manchester | | | | | ||
Aug. 24, 25|11 All Ireland, at | 71| 94| 165 | 47| 32|| 79
|Dublin |____|____|_____|____|____||____
|Totals | 684| 305| 989 | 393| 171 || 564

[Footnote 1: Unfinished innings, only six wickets down.]
[Footnote 2: Second innings unfinished, only four wickets down.]

The ball players did not lose a single game, and had the best of it in
the games which were drawn from not having time to put them out. The trip
cost the two clubs over $2,000, exclusive of the amount received at the
gate. In fact, the Britishers did not take to the game kindly at all.

To show what the All England eleven could do in the way of playing base
ball, the score of a game played in Boston in October, 1868, after the
All England eleven had played their cricket match there, is given below:

American Nine 3 2 0 0 1 6 3 5 0 || 20
English Cricketers' Nine 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 || 4

George Wright pitched for the cricketers, the nine including Smith c;
Tarrant 1b; Peeley 2b; Shaw 3b; Humphrey ss; Jupp lf; Clarkwood cf, and
Rowbotham rf.

The American nine was a weak picked nine, including O'Brien--a Boston
cricketer--and Archy Buch, of Harvard, as the battery; Shaw, Barrows and
Lowell on the bases; Pratt as short stop, and Smith Rogers and Conant in
the out field.

In all the base-ball games in which the English professional cricketers
took part during their visits to America from 1859 to 1880, they failed to
begin to equal in their ball play the work done by the ball players in
cricket in England.

* * * * *

THE GREAT BASE BALL TRIP AROUND THE
WORLD IN 1888-'89.

[Illustration: ALL AMERICA.
BROWN FOGARTY CARROLL WARD HEALY HANLON WOOD CRANE MANNING EARLE.]

[Illustration: CHICAGO TEAM.]

The greatest historical event recorded in the annals of the national game
was undoubtedly the journey to Australia, which began in November, 1888,
and ended in March, 1889, on a trip around the world. While in 1874 Mr. A.
G. Spalding was the _avant cornier_ of the visiting party of base ball
players to England, and also one of the most prominent of the victorious
team players; in 1888 Mr. Spalding was the originator of the trip, the
master spirit of the remarkable enterprise, and the leader of the band of
base ball missionaries to the antipodes. Of course, in recording the
Australian trip in the GUIDE for 1889, only a cursory glance can be taken
of the trip, as it would require a volume of itself to do the tour
justice. Suffice it to say that the pluck, energy and business enterprise
which characterized the unequaled event reflected the highest credit not
only on Mr. Albert G. Spalding, as the representative spirit of Western
business men, but also on the American name in every respect, and it did
for the extension of the popularity of our national game in six short
months what as many years of effort under ordinary circumstances would
have failed to do.

The party of tourists which started on their journey to Australia on
October 20, 1888, met with an enthusiastic welcome on their route to San
Francisco, and in that city they were given a reception on their arrival
and a send-off on their departure for Australia, unequaled in the history
of the game on the Pacific coast. The record of the series of games played
by the two teams--Chicago and All America--en route to San Francisco and
while in that city, is appended:

DATE |CLUBS. |CITIES. |PITCHERS. |SCORE.
-------+------------+--------------+----------------+-------
Oct. 20|Chicago vs. |Chicago |Spalding, | 11--6
|America. | |Hutchinson |
" 21|" " "|St. Paul |Baldwin, Healy | 8--5
" 22|" " "|Minneapolis |Baldwin, Duryca | 1--0
" 22|America vs. | " |Van Haltren, | 6--3
|Chicago. | |Tener |
" 23|Chicago vs. |Cedar Rapids |Tener, | 6--5
|America. | |Hutchinson |
" 24|America vs. |Des Moines |Hutchinson, | 3--2
|Chicago. | |Baldwin. |
" 25|" " "|Omaha |Healy, Ryan | 12--2
" 26|Chicago vs. |Hastings |Baldwin, | 8--4
|America. | | Van Haltren |
" 27|" " "|Denver |Tener, Healy | 16--2
" 28|America vs. | " |Crane, Baldwin | 9--8
|Chicago. | | |
" 29|Chicago vs. |Colorado |Ryan, Healy | 3--9
|America. | Spr's | |
" 31|America vs. |Salt Lake |Crane, Tener | 19--3
|Chicago. | City | |
Nov. 1|" " " | " " " |Healy, Baldwin | 10--3
" 4|" " " |San Francisco.| " " | 4--4
" 11|" " " | " " |Van Haltren, | 9--6
| | |Tener |
" 14|Chicago vs. |Los Angeles |Baldwin, Healy | 5--0
|America. | | |
" 15|America vs. | " " |Crane, Tener | 7--4
|Chicago. | | |

The teams, when they left San Francisco on November 18, 1888, included
the following players: