January 09, 2003

THE AMERICAN GAMES. 24

The struggle between the East and the West in the American arena in 1888
resulted as follows:

EAST VS. WEST.

CLUBS. | | | K | || | G |
| | C | a | L || | a |
| S | i | n | o || | m | P
| t | n | s | u || G | e | e
| . | c | a | i || a | s | r
| | i | s | s || m | | c
| L | n | | v || e | P | e
| o | n | C | i || s | l | n
| u | a | i | l || | a | t
| i | t | t | l || W | y | a
| s | i | y | e || o | e | g
| . | . | . | . || n | d | e
| | | | || . | . | .
----------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Athletic | 7| 10| 14| 15|| 46| 74|.622
Brooklyn | 10| 14| 11| 13|| 48| 80|.600
Baltimore | 6| 6| 11| 11|| 34| 79|.430
Cleveland | 4| 7| 10| 9|| 30| 73|.411
+---+---+---+---++----+----+
Games lost| 27| 37| 40| 48|| 158| 306|


WEST VS. EAST.

CLUBS. | | | | || | G |
| | | | || | a |
| | | | || | m | P
| | | B | C || G | e | e
| A | B | a | l || a | s | r
| t | r | l | e || m | | c
| h | o | t | v || e | P | e
| l | o | i | e || s | l | n
| e | k | m | l || | a | t
| t | l | o | a || W | y | a
| i | y | r | n || o | e | g
| c | n | e | d || n | d | e
| . | . | . | . || . | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
St. Louis | 10| 10| 14| 16|| 50| 77|.649
Cincinnati | 10| 6| 14| 10|| 40| 77|.519
Kansas City | 3| 9| 8| 9|| 29| 75|.387
Louisville | 5| 7| 9| 8|| 29| 77|.377
+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Games lost | 28| 32| 45| 43|| 148| 306|

It will be seen that the East won by 158 to 148.


PHENOMENAL CONTEST.

The most noteworthy contest of the season in the League championship
arena in 1888, was the game played at the Polo Grounds on September 4,
between the New York and Philadelphia teams. In this game eleven innings
had been completed without either side being able to score a single run
when sunset obliged the umpire to call the game on account of darkness.
The turnstile count showed that 9,505 people had passed through the gates.

It was a pitchers' contest from start to finish, both Keefe and Sanders
doing great work in the curving line. But ten base hits were made in the
eleven innings, six against Sanders and but four against Keefe. O'Rourke,
Richardson and Andrews led the little batting that was done.

The fielding play was of a phenomenal order, brilliant stops, catches and
throws occurring in every inning, and being loudly applauded.

The Philadelphians all but had the game in the tenth inning, but over
anxiety lost them the chance. Farrar was on third and might have scored on
Mulvey's fly to Slattery. He left the base, however, before the ball was
caught, and was promptly declared out. The score was:

NEW YORK.
| T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
--------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Slattery, cf | 5| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0
Ewing, c | 5| 0| 0| 8| 3| 0
Tiernan, rf | 5| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0
Connor, 1b | 3| 0| 0| 15| 0| 0
Ward, ss | 4| 0| 0| 2| 3| 1
Richardson, 2b| 4| 0| 2| 3| 2| 0
Whitney, 3b | 3| 0| 1| 1| 5| 1
O'Rourke, lf | 4| 0| 2| 1| 1| 0
Keefe, p | 4| 0| 1| 1| 10| 0
+---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals | 37| 0| 6| 33| 25| 2

PHILADELPHIA.
| T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Andrew, 3 cf | 5| 0| 2| 1| 0| 0
Fogarty, rf | 4| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0
Farrar, 1b | 4| 0| 0| 12| 1| 0
Delahanty, lf| 4| 0| 0| 2| 0| 0
Mulvey, 3b | 4| 0| 0| 0| 2| 0
Sanders, p | 4| 0| 0| 1| 7| 0
Schriver, c | 4| 0| 1| 9| 4| 0
Irwin, ss | 4| 0| 0| 5| 4| 0
Bastian, 1b | 3| 0| 0| 2| 3| 0

+---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals | 36| 0| 4| 33| 18| 0


Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0
NewYork 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0

Two-base hit--O'Rourke. Double plays--Keefe and Connor, Farrar and
Sanders. First base on balls--Connor, Whitney, Bastain. First base on
errors--Philadelphia, 1. Struck out--Tiernan, Whitney, Keefe, 2; Andrews,
Fogarty, 2: Delehanty, Mulvey, Sanders, Schriver, Irwin. Wild pitches--
Keefe, 2; Sanders, 1. Time--Two hours. Umpire--Kelly.

REMARKABLE EVENTS.

LONGEST GAME.--Played at Boston May 11, 1877, between the Harvard College
nine and the Manchester professional team, twenty-four innings, score 0 to
0.

BEST LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH.--Played August 17, 1882, at Providence,
between the Providence and Detroit teams, eighteen innings, score 1 to 0--
_seventeen innings without a run!_

NEXT BEST LEAGUE CLUB GAME.--Played at St. Louis on May 1, 1877, between
the St. Louis team and the Syracuse Stars, fifteen innings, score 0 to 0--
a drawn match.

BEST INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION GAME.--Played May 7, 1878, at Lynn, Mass.,
between the Live Oak team of Lynn, and the Crickets of Binghamton, fifteen
innings, score 1 to 0.

BEST JUNIOR GAME.--Played at Hoboken, August 19, 1878, fifteen innings,
score 1 to 0.

SHORTEST GAME.--Excelsior vs. Field in Brooklyn on Excelsior's grounds,
in May, 1861--50 minutes, 9 innings.

LONGEST THROW.--By John Hatfield, made at Union Grounds, Brooklyn, Oct.
15, 1872. Distance 133 yards, 1 foot, 7 inches-- over 400 feet.

GREATEST SCORE.--In match between the Niagara Club, of Buffalo, and a
visiting nine at Buffalo in 1864, score 202 to 26.

THE THROWING CONTESTS RECORDS.

The longest throw of a baseball on record up to 1872 was that made in
1868 by John Hatfield, then a member of the Cincinnati team, he then
throwing a ball 132 yards. In October, 1872, a throwing contest took place
on the old Union ball grounds, Brooklyn, in which John Hatfield--then of
the Mutuals--threw the ball 133 yds, 1 ft 7-1/2 in., the distance being
officially measured. The contest was also participated in by Andy Leonard,
whose record was 119 yds. 1 ft. 10 in.; George Wright, 117 yds. 1 ft. 1
in.; Billy Boyd, 115 yds. 1 ft. 7 in.; Fisler, 112 yds. 6 in., and Anson,
110 yds. 6 in. This throw of Hatfield's--over 400 ft.--has never been
equaled in any regular throwing contest.

On September 9, 1882, a throwing match took place on the Chicago ball
grounds between E. Williamson of the Chicago Club and Pfeffer of the
Troys. Three trials were had and Pfeffer's best throw was 132 yards and 5
inches. Williamson's best throw was 132 yards, 1 foot, or four feet seven
and one half inches short of Hatfield's champion throw.

In 1884, while connected with the Boston Union Association Club, Ed
Crane, while in Cincinnati October 12 of that year, was credited with
throwing a baseball 135 yards, 1 foot, and 1/2 inch, and also again at St.
Louis on October 19, he was credited with throwing a ball 134 yards, 5
inches. But the circumstances attendant upon both trials were not such as
to warrant an official record, so the _Clipper_ says, through its editor
for 1888, Mr. A. H. Wright, in his answer to a query on the subject. At
any rate, Crane has not since reached such figures, and he is as swift a
thrower now as ever.

The throwing contest which took place at Cincinnati in 1888, at intervals
through the summer and fall, failed to result in the record being beaten,
though some very good long distance throwing was done, as will be seen by
the appended record:

Rank| PLAYERS. |CLUB. | Distance Thrown.
----+------------+-----------+------------------
1 | Williamson |Chicago | 399 feet 11 inches.
2 | Griffin |Baltimore | 372 " 8 "
3 | Stovey |Athletic | 369 " 2 "
4 | Vaughn |Louisville | 366 " 9 "
5 | Burns |Brooklyn | 364 " 6 "
6 | O'Brien |Brooklyn | 361 " 5 "
7 | Collins |Brooklyn | 354 " 6 "
8 | Tebeau |Cincinnati | 353 " 0 "
9 | Gilks |Cleveland | 343 " 11 "
10 | Reilly |Cincinnati | 341 " 6 "
11 | Brennan |Kansas City| 339 " 6 "
12 | Stricker |Cleveland | 337 " 8 "
13 | Foutz |Brooklyn | 335 " 4 "
14 | Davis |Kansas City| 333 " 6 "
15 | O'Connor |Cincinnati | 330 " 0 "
16 | McTamany |Kansas City| 327 " 6 "

When Williamson threw, the grounds were slippery, but he managed to
easily win the $100 prize money and diamond locket. One hundred and thirty-
three yards eight inches, was the distance Williamson threw, and he would
have done still better and beaten Hatfield's throw, had the conditions
been more favorable.

The best throw of a cricket ball on record is that of W. F. Torbes, of
Eton College, England, in March, 1876, the distance foeing 132 yards.

The longest throw of a lacrosse ball is that made by W. B. Kenny, at
Melbourne, Australia, in September, 1886, the ball being thrown from his
lacrosse stick 446 feet. The longest in America was that of Ross McKenzie,
in Montreal, on October, 1882, he throwing the ball 422 feet.