December 26, 2002

THE WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP. 22

THE FULL RECORD OF THE SERIES.

It has now become an established rule of the National League and the
American Association, to close each season with a supplementary
championship series of games between the teams of the two leading clubs
winning the respective championships of the two organizations each year,
to decide as to which of the two champion clubs is entitled to the honor
of being the champion club of the United States, and consequently the
world's champions in base ball. This supplementary series of games has
grown in importance each year since the inaugural trial games of 1884,
when a short series of games of this character took place on the Polo
Grounds in October, 1884, between the League championship team of the
Providence Club and the American championship team of the Metropolitan
Club. It was a short series of best two games of the three played, the
result being an easy victory for the League team, as the appended record
shows:

THE SERIES OF 1884.

Oct. 23, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 6--0
Oct. 24, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 3--1
Oct. 25, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds 12--2
Total 21--3


THE SERIES OF 1885.

In 1885 the St. Louis Club first won the honors in the American pennant
race, and the Chicago team in that of the League, and in October of that
year the rival teams contested for the United States championship in a
series of best four out of seven games. Though the series was a far more
important one than that of 1884, still the rules governing the special
games were not what they should have been, and consequently the result was
not satisfactory, as a dispute, followed by a forfeited game, led to a
draw contest and an equal division of the gate receipts.

In this series $1,000 was the prize competed for, and as neither team won
the series, each club received $500 of the prize money, each winning three
games after the first game had been drawn. The record of these games is
appended:

Oct. 14, St, Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings) 5-5
Oct. 15, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at St. Louis (6 innings) forfeited 5-4
Oct. 16, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis 7-4
Oct. 17, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St.Louis 3-2
Oct. 22, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Pittsburg (7 innings) 9-2
Oct 23, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Cincinnati 9-2
Oct. 24, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Cincinnati 13-4

Total victories for Chicago, 3: for St. Louis, 3, with one game drawn
Total runs scored by Chicago, 43: by St. Louis, 41.


THE SERIES OF 1886.

In 1886 the Chicago and St. Louis club teams again won the championship
honors of their respective associations, and they again entered the lists
for the "world's championship," this series being best out of six games,
three being played at Chicago, and three at St. Louis; the winner of the
series taking ail the gate receipts. The result was the success of the St.
Louis team, the scores being as follows:

Oct. 18, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago 6-0
Oct. 19, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings) 12-0
Oct. 20, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago (8 innings) 11-4
Oct. 21, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (7 innings) 8-5
Oct. 22, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (6 innings) 10-3
Oct. 23, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (10 innings) 4-3

Total runs for St. Louis, 38; for Chicago, 29.


THE SERIES OF 1887.

In 1887 the world's championship series had become an established
supplementary series of contests, and in this year these contests excited
more interest than had previously been manifested in regard to them, the
demands made upon the two contesting teams--the Detroit champions of the
League and the St. Louis champions of the American Association--for a
game of the series from the large cities of the East and West being such
as to lead the two clubs to extend the series to one of best out of
fifteen games. These were played at St. Louis, Detroit, Chicago, and
Pittsburg in the W st, and at New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Philadelphia,
and Baltimore in the East. The series began in St. Louis, and the eighth
victory of the Detroits was won at Baltimore, St. Louis winning the last
game of the series at St. Louis. The record of the fifteen games, showing
the pitchers in each contest, is as follows:

Date. |Contesting |Cities. |Pitchers. |Innings.|Score.
|Clubs. | | | |
-------+-------------+------------+--------------+--------+------
Oct. 10|St. Louis v. |St. Louis |Carruthers, | 9 | 6-1
| Detroit | |Getzein | |
" 11|Detroit v. |St. Louis |Conway, Foutz | 9 | 5-3
| St. Louis | | | |
" 12| " " " |Detroit |Getzein, | 13 | 2-1
| | |Carruthers | |
" 13| " " " |Pittsburg |Baldwin, King | 9 | 8-0
" 14|St. Louis v. |Brooklyn |Carruthers, | 9 | 5-2
| Detroit | |Conway | |
" 15|Detroit v. |New York |Getzein, Foutz| 9 | 9-0
| St. Louis | | | |
" 17|" " " |Philadelphia|Baldwin, | 9 | 3-1
| | |Carruthers | |
" 18| " " " |Boston |Baldwin, | 9 | 9-2
| | |Carruthers | |
" 19| " " " |Philadelphia|Conway, King | 9 | 4-2
" 21|St. Louis v. |Washington |Carruthers, | 9 | 11-4
[1] | Detroit | |Getzein | |
" 21|Detroit v. |Baltimore |Baldwin, Foutz| 9 | 13-3
[2] | St. Louis | | | |
" 22|" " " |Baltimore |Baldwin, Foutz| 9 | 13-3
" 24|" " " |Detroit |Baldwin, | 9 | 6-3
| | |Carruthers | |
" 25|" " " |Chicago |Getzein, King | 9 | 4-3
" 26|St. Louis v. |St. Louis |Carruthers, | 6 | 9-2
| Detroit | |Baldwin | |
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[Footnote 1: A.M.]
[Footnote 2: P.M.]


THE SERIES OF 1888.

The contest for the world's championship in 1888 was the most exciting
and important of any yet played; and the public attention given to the
series throughout the entire base ball world, was such as to show that it
would be a paying policy on the part of the League and the Association to
establish a supplementary championship season, to begin on the first of
October each year, the series of games to be played including not only
that for the world's championship, but also to include contests between
the other clubs of each organization so as to settle the question as to
which were the eight leading professional teams of the country.

Prior to 1888 but three clubs had participated in the regular series, and
these were: St. Louis on the one hand, and Chicago (twice) and Detroit on
the other. In 1888, however, a new League candidate entered the field
against the St. Louis champions, and that was the New York club team, it
being the first time the two clubs had ever encountered each other. The
series arranged between the two clubs was one of ten games, the first six
victories to decide the contest. They were commenced at the Polo Grounds
on October 16, and the opening contest gave promise of a very interesting
series of games, and when the St. Louis team "Chicagoed" their League
adversaries the next day the interest in the matches doubled. But the
close of the first week's games left New York in the van with a credit of
four victories out of the five games played. The contest of the 19th took
place in Brooklyn, but the other four were played at the Polo Grounds, the
largest attendance of the whole series being that of Saturday, Oct. 20,
when the receipts exceeded $5,000. At the four games played at the Polo
Grounds the aggregate of receipts was $15,405, while the aggregate of
receipts at the four games at St. Louis, was but $5,612, less than that at
the Saturday game at the Polo Grounds the previous week. The game at
Brooklyn was marred by the bad weather, while that at Philadelphia was
dampened by the lead the New York team had previously attained. The series
virtually ended at St. Louis on October 25, when New York won their sixth
victory and the championship. After that Ward left the New York team to
join the Australian tourists, and the interest in the games ended, the
receipts falling off from $2,365 on October 25 to $411 on October 26. The
last game of the series was a mere ordinary exhibition game, Titcomb
pitching in four innings and Hatfield in four. The player's game on the
28th was even less attractive, the St. Louis team winning easily by 6 to
0, Keefe, Welch and George taking turns in the box for New York. The
record of the series in full is as follows:


Date. |Contesting |Cities. |Pitchers. |In's.|Scr. |Rec
|Clubs. | | | | |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+
Oct 16 |N. York v. |New York |Keefe | | |
| St. Louis | |King | 9 | 2-1 | $2,876
" 17 |St. Louis v. | " " |Chamberlain | | |
| N. York | |Welch | 9 | 3-0 | 3,375
" 18 |N. York v. | " " |Keefe | | |
| St. Louis | |King | 9 | 4-2 | 3,530
" 19 | " " " |Brooklyn |Crane | | |
| | |Chamberlain | 9 | 6-3 | 1,502
" 20 | " " " |New York |Keefe | | |
| | |King | 8 | 6-4 | 5,624
" 22 | " " " |Phild'l'a |Welch | | |
| | |Chamberlain | 8 | 12-5 | 1,781
" 24 |St. Louis v. |St. Louis |King | | |
| N. York | |Crane | 8 | 7-5 | 2,624
" 25 |N. York v. | " " |King | | |
| St. Louis | |Chamberlain | 9 | 11-3 | 2,365
" 26 |St. Louis v. | " " |King | | |
| N. York | |George | 10 | 14-11| 411
" 27 | " " " | " " |Chamberlain,| | |
| | |Titcomb | 9 | 18-7 | 212
Hatfeld, |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+------------
Total | | | | | | $24,362
Total Runs--New York, 64; St. Louis, 60.

Pitchers' Victories--Keefe, 4; Welch, 1; King, 2; Chamberlain, 2; Crane, 1.

Pitchers' Defeats--Keefe, 0; Welch, 1; Crane, 1; Titcomb, 1; King, 3;
Chamberlain, 3.