November 07, 2002

THE VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE. 15

Those of the players who have taken part in League contests for not less
than ten years are entitled to the honor of belonging to the ranks of the
veterans of the League, and they include the following representative
players, the majority of whom are now in League Clubs:

|Number |Number | | |
|of |of | |First |
|Seasons|Games |Times | Base | Perc-
Name. |played.|played.|at bat.| hits.| entage
-----------------+-------+-------+-------+------+-------
Adrian C. Anson | 13 | 1173 | 4904 | 1751 | .357
James O'Rourke | 13 | 1133 | 4832 | 1519 | .314
James L. White | 13 | 1101 | 4610 | 1439 | .312
Paul Hines | 13 | 1184 | 5112 | 1591 | .311
E. B. Sutton | 13 | 1007 | 4196 | 1216 | .289
John F. Morrill | 13 | 1194 | 4685 | 1253 | .267
John J. Burdock | 13 | 871 | 3584 | 911 | .254
M. J. Kelly | 11 | 1080 | 4370 | 1421 | .325
A. Dalrymple | 11 | 909 | 4041 | 1198 | .296
Joseph Start | 11 | 776 | 3366 | 995 | .295
E. N. Williamson | 11 | 1071 | 4163 | 1133 | .274
Geo. F. Gore | 10 | 886 | 3689 | 1157 | .313
Hardy Richardson | 10 | 910 | 3974 | 1230 | .309
John W. Glasscock| 10 | 952 | 3847 | 1089 | .283
Chas. W. Bennett | 10 | 709 | 2720 | 761 | .279
Joseph Hornung | 10 | 858 | 3706 | 988 | .266
F. S. Flint | 10 | 708 | 2759 | 669 | .242
Jas. McCormick | 10 | 499 | 1957 | 464 | .237
D. W. Force | 10 | 746 | 2873 | 598 | .208

Of these Sutton, Dalrymple, Burdock, and Force are in the service of
minor League Clubs, while the retired players include Start and McCormick.

Those who have played for less than ten years and not less than seven
include the following second class of veterans, the first class being
limited to players who have a credit of a decade of service:

|Number |Number | | |
|of |of | |First |
|Seasons|Games |Times | Base | Perc-
Name. |played.|played.|at bat.| hits.| entage
-----------------+-------+-------+-------+------+-------
Dennis Brouthers | 9 | 845 | 3578 | 1267 | .354
Rodger Connor | 9 | 943 | 3870 | 1309 | .338
J. C. Howe | 9 | 827 | 3548 | 1067 | .300
Geo. A. Wood | 9 | 854 | 3677 | 1024 | .278
M. C. Dorgan | 9 | 660 | 2719 | 756 | .277
Thomas Burns | 9 | 900 | 3597 | 990 | .275
Edwin Hanlon | 9 | 893 | 3629 | 972 | .267
Jno. M. Ward | 9 | 1046 | 4403 | 1169 | .265
A. A. Irwin | 9 | 796 | 3136 | 796 | .254
Jno. Farrell | 9 | 729 | 3048 | 776 | .254
M. Welch | 9 | 491 | 1817 | 433 | .238
B. Gilligan | 9 | 510 | 1848 | 380 | .209
Jos. F. Galvin | 9 | 524 | 2000 | 418 | .208
Wm. Ewing | 8 | 640 | 2708 | 812 | .299
Fred Dunlap | 8 | 707 | 2972 | 867 | .292
P. Gillespie | 8 | 703 | 2907 | 817 | .278
Thomas York | 8 | 566 | 2291 | 617 | .269
Robert Ferguson | 8 | 538 | 2209 | 596 | .269
Jas. E. Whitney | 8 | 525 | 2085 | 555 | .266
Jeremiah Denny | 8 | 824 | 3308 | 881 | .266
Chas. Radbourn | 8 | 530 | 2092 | 517 | .247
George Shaffer | 7 | 521 | 2137 | 602 | .281
Sam W. Wise | 7 | 698 | 2826 | 785 | .277
Jno. E. Clapp | 7 | 398 | 1688 | 465 | .275
W. A. Purcell | 7 | 500 | 2136 | 559 | .261
J P. Cassidy | 7 | 416 | 1718 | 433 | .252
J. J. Gerhardt | 7 | 565 | 2182 | 489 | .224
Geo. E. Weidman | 7 | 338 | 1273 | 22* | .1*4
| | | | [A] | [A]
[**Proofreaders note A: * Indecipherable number**]

Of the above Gillespie, Dorgan, Clapp, York, Ferguson and Cassidy have
retired from field service.

One of the most interesting records of the games played in the
professional arena during the past eighteen years of the existence, first
of the old National Association from 1871 to 1875 inclusive, and then of
the National League from 1876 to 1888 inclusive, is that of the contests
each year between the rival Boston and Chicago clubs, the former winning
the pennant in 1872, '73, '74, '75, '77 and '78, and also in 1883; while
Chicago won it in 1876 and in 1880, '81, '82, '85 and '86. As a matter for
interesting reference, we give below the full record of victories and
defeats scored by the two clubs from 1871 to 1888 inclusive. The Chicago
Club did not play in 1872 and 1873, having been burned out in the great
fire of '71.

|1871 |1872 |1873 |1874 |1875 |1876 |1877 |1878 |1879
-------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----
|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
Boston |22|10|39| 8|43|16|52|18|71| 8|39|31|31|17|41|19|49|20
Chicago|20| 9| -| -| -| -|27|31|30|37|52|14|18|30|30|30|44|32


|1880|1881|1882|1883|1884|1885|1886|1887|1888
-------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----
|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
Boston |40|44|38|45|45|39|63|35|73|38|46|66|56|61|61|60|70|64
Chicago|67|17|56|28|55|29|59|39|62|50|87|25|90|31|71|50|77|58

THE LEAGUE'S PRESIDENT.

The close of the League campaign of 1888 saw the President of the League,
Mr. N. E. Young, enter upon a new era in the history of his official
duties, first as Secretary, then as President-Secretary, two positions he
has so faithfully and efficiently filled since the organization of the
League. Mr. Young was prominent in organizing the first professional
National Association; and but for him Mr. Chadwick would not have been
able to have carried out his project of dividing the baseball fraternity
into the two officially recognized classes which he did when he started
the first professional Association in 1871. From that year to 1875
inclusive, Mr. Young acted as Secretary of the old National Association,
and when it was superseded by the National League in 1876 he was elected
Secretary of the new organization, Mr. Bulkely, the present Governor of
Connecticut, being the League's first President. Mr. Young was also
Secretary under the Presidency of Mr. A. G. Mills, and when that gentleman
resigned, the worthy Secretary was elected to the joint offices of
President, Secretary and Treasurer of the League, and this position he has
most capably filled ever since.

A Washington journalist has this well-merited compliment to say of the
veteran:

"The rugged honesty of the League president is a matter with which those
interested in base ball have long been familiar. His residence is in
Washington, and he was for years a player and umpire, having all the ups
and downs usual to their lot, but he is now in very comfortable
circumstances. The duties of his office require a cool-headed man, able to
do justice to all without fear or favor. It is singularly trying at times,
but though the intense rivalry of the different clubs sometimes causes the
managers to lose their heads and charge unfairness against the umpires,
not a word has ever been said that would in any way compromise Nick Young.
It is an honor and credit to the baseball magnates that they have such a
man at the head of the League."

THE JOINT RULES COMMITTEE AND THEIR WORK.

[Illustration: N.E. Young.]

The work accomplished by the Joint Rules Committee of the National League
and the American Association at their meeting in New York in November,
1888, ranks with the best on record in the revision of the playing rules
of the game, and the successful results achieved in improving the code was
largely due to the marked efficiency evinced by the chairman of the
Committee, Mr. Chas. H. Byrne, the president of the Brooklyn club, who was
indefatigable in doing the large amount of revisory work which was thrown
upon the committee. In the face of a very noisy and sensational demand for
radical changes in the rules governing the game, the committee, as a
whole, manifested a wise conservatism in several respects, which cannot
help but be of material assistance in advancing the welfare of the game at
large. In the first place, by reducing the powers of the attack nearer to
an equality with those of the defence--which result was accomplished when
they reduced the number of called balls from five to four--they not only
adopted a rule which will moderate the dangerous speed in delivering the
ball to the bat, but they thereby afforded the batsman an additional
chance for more effective work at the bat. This latter point, too, has
been aided by reducing the number of outs the batsman has hitherto been
unfairly subjected to. The rule which puts batsmen out on catches of foul
balls, which, since the game originated, has been an unfair rule of play,
has seen its best day; and this year the entering wedge to its ultimate
disappearance has been driven in, with the practical result of the repeal
of the foul tip catch. This improvement, too, is in the line of aiding the
batting side, as it gets rid of one of the numerous ways of putting the
batsman out.

The argument brought to bear in favor of the elimination of outs from
foul balls from the code was in the main as follows:

When the batsman hits a fair ball, while at the same time that he gives
the fielders a chance to put him out, he himself is also given an equal
chance of making a base or of scoring a run; but when he hits a foul ball,
while he affords the fielders an opportunity to catch him out, no such
compensating advantage is given him in the way of earning a base or a run
as in the case of a fair hit ball; and it is in this that the working of
the foul ball rule becomes so palpably unjust. It is sufficient punishment
for hitting a foul ball that he, as batsman, be deprived of making a base,
without adding the unjust penalty of an out. This one sided condition of
things, too, is increased when a double play is made on the catch of a
foul ball, for not only is the batsman unfairly punished, but also the
base runner who may have made the base by a clean hit.

It is this latter unfair rule which the committee repealed in getting rid
of the foul fly tip; and now a batsman who has earned his base by a safe
hit and who runs to the next base on a foul fly tip ball caught by the
catcher, can no longer be put out on the double play, as he is now allowed
to return to the base he left on the hit, as in the case of a foul ball
not caught.

Another step in advance was made by the committee when they officially
recognized a sacrifice hit as a factor in team work at the bat. Hitherto
far too great stress has been laid upon the alleged skill of the batsman
in making extra hits--two and three baggers and home runs--at the cost of
giving due credit to the batting which forwards base runners and sends in
runs. The work of the slugging batsman who, nearly every time he goes to
the bat when no one is on the bases, makes an extra hit, does not compare
with that of the team worker who either by a single base hit or a
sacrifice hit forwards a runner round the bases, or sends a run in. Here
is where the batting averages prove to be complete failures so far as
affording a criterion of a batsman's value in team work is concerned;
which work, by the way, is neither more nor less than that of forwarding
base runners or sending runs in by batting--for one batsman may make four
extra base hits in a game without forwarding a runner or sending in a run
in a single instance, while another batsman may make but one safe hit and
three sacrifice hits, and yet either forward as many runners or send in as
many runs.

Probably the best piece of work done by the committee was the amendment
they made to the rules governing the umpire, wherein, in defining the
powers of an umpire to impose a fine of not less than $5 nor more than $25
for abusive, threatening or improper language to the umpire, an amendment
was made as follows:

"A repetition of the offence shall subject such player to a removal from
the game, and the immediate substitution of another player then in
uniform."

Lastly, the rule admitting of an extra substitute being allowed to play
in the game, at the option of the captain of either of the contesting
teams, though an experiment, gives promise of being a desirable amendment.
The classifying of the code of rules so as to facilitate the finding of
any special rule during the hurry of a contest in progress, was also a
desirable improvement. Take it altogether, the present committee did
excellent work at their Fall meeting of 1888.