October 03, 2002

THE MONTHLY RECORDS. 10

The month of _April_ saw Boston taking the lead in the record of
victories for that month, that club not sustaining a single defeat in
April. Chicago stood second, with New York and Pittsburgh tied in the
number of victories and defeats credited and charged to each club, Detroit
standing fifth, while Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Washington brought up
the rear.

_In May_ Chicago led all the other teams in their victories that month;
Detroit being second, Philadelphia third, New York fourth, and Boston
fifth, Indianapolis being sixth, with Pittsburgh and Washington tied for
last place in the May record, Boston and Pittsburgh falling off badly this
month.

_In June_ Detroit won the most victories, it being their best month's
work of the season, Chicago being second, Philadelphia third, New York
fourth, Boston fifth, Washington sixth, with Indianapolis seventh and
Pittsburgh last, it being the latter club's poorest month's work of the
campaign.

_In July_ the new rule of management, inaugurated by Mr. Day, placed New
York in the front, and the result was that the "Giants" in July made the
best month's record of the season, over 18 victories to but five defeats;
Detroit stood second on the list in July victories, with Pittsburgh third,
the latter making a good rally in July; Indianapolis, too, played well
this month and stood fourth, Washington being fifth, and Chicago sixth,
the latter taking a bad tumble, Philadelphia and Boston being the two last
in July victories, Boston winning but five victories out of twenty-two
games, that club's worst monthly record.

_In August_ Boston rallied in brilliant style, scoring 16 victories out
of 22 games, quite a contrast to their poor work in July; New York was
second, and Pittsburgh third, the latter doing better, even, than in July;
Philadelphia stood fourth, Chicago fifth, Washington sixth, with
Indianapolis seventh and Detroit last, the latter only winning five
victories out of 21 games in August.

_In September_ Chicago rallied well and went to the front in the record
of the month's victories, Pittsburgh being second, New York third, Detroit
fourth--the latter rallying; Philadelphia sixth, with Indianapolis and
Washington bringing up the rear. By the close of the month New York had
virtually settled the question of the championship, and the only struggle
left was that for second place.

_In October_ Philadelphia made its usual "spurt" at the finish, and that
club won eight out of nine games in October, after giving Chicago a close
fight for second place, and came in a good third in the pennant race. New
York was second in the October victories, Boston third, Pittsburgh and
Washington tied for fourth, Chicago was sixth--that club gaining second
position in the pennant race; Indianapolis and Washington being the two
last. Here is the full record of the monthly victories and defeats of the
campaign:

|April| May | June| July| Aug.|Sept.| Oct.||Totals.
------------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++---------
|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
New York | 5| 3|12| 9|13|11|18| 5|16| 8|13| 8| 7| 3||84|47|131
Chicago | 6| 2|15| 7|14| 8|10|14|12|13|16| 9| 4| 5||77|58|135
Philadelphia| 2| 7|12| 7|13|10| 9|15|15| 9|10|12| 8| 1||69|61|130
Boston | 9| 0|11|13|12|11| 5|17|16| 6|12|12| 5| 5||70|64|134
Detroit | 3| 5|14| 8|16| 6|14|10| 5|16|13|11| 3| 7||68|63|131
Pittsburg | 5| 3| 7|14| 5|15|13| 9|16| 9|15|12| 5| 6||66|68|134
Indianapolis| 2| 6| 8|14| 7|14|13|11| 6|21|10|13| 4| 6||50|85|135
Washington | 1| 7| 7|14| 9|14|11|12|10|14| 5|19| 5| 6||48|86|134

[Illustration: A. C. Anson. ]

THE LEADING PLAYERS OF THE LEAGUE.

Looking over the League averages, and taking those players who have taken
part in a majority of the championship contests of the season, we find the
appended names among those occupying the leading positions at the bat and
in the field.

Of those who played in one hundred games and over in the League
championship arena, the following comprise the first ten batsmen:

|BATSMEN. |CLUB. |Games.|Per cent. of
| | | |Base Hits.
--+---------+--------+------+---------
1|Anson |Chicago | 134 | .343
2|Ryan |Chicago | 130 | .331
3|Kelly |Boston | 105 | .318
4|Brouthers|Detroit | 129 | .306
5|Ewing |New York| 103 | .306
6|White |Detroit | 125 | .298
7|Johnston |Boston | 135 | .295
8|Tiernan |New York| 113 | .293
9|Connor |New York| 134 | .291
10|Nash |Boston | 135 | .283

Of those who played in one hundred games and over in the League campaign,
the following are the first seven in fielding averages:

FIELDERS. |POSITION. |CLUB. |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
| | | |Average.| of
| | | | |Base Hits.
----------+--------------+---------+------+--------+----------
Anson |First Baseman |Chicago | 134 | .985 | .343
Richardson|Second Baseman|New York | 135 | .942 | .226
Nash |Third Baseman |Boston. | 104 | .913 | .283
Glasscock |Short Stop |Ind'polis| 109 | .900 | .269
Hornung |Left Fielder |Boston | 107 | .947 | .239
Slattery |Center Fielder|New York | 103 | .917 | .245
Tiernan |Right Fielder |New York | 113 | .959 | .293

Of the pitchers who took part in 50 games and over, the following led in
fielding averages:

No pitcher or catcher played in 100 games.

PITCHERS.|CLUB. |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
| | |Average.| of
| | | |Base Hits.
---------+---------+------+--------+----------
Keefe |New York | 51 | .785 | .127
Galvin |Pittsburg| 50 | .758 | .143
Morris |Pittsburg| 54 | .732 | .102
Clarkson |Boston | 54 | .678 | .195

Of the catchers who took part in 60 games and over, the following led in
fielding averages:

CATCHERS.|CLUB. |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
| | |Average.| of
| | | |Base Hits.
---------+------------+------+--------+----------
Bennett |Detroit | 72 | .941 | .263
Daly |Chicago | 62 | .880 | .191
Clements |Philadelphia| 84 | .874 | .247
Ewing |New York | 78 | .861 | .306
Mack |Washington | 79 | .843 | .186
Miller |Pittsburg | 68 | .805 | .277
Kelly |Boston | 74 | .796 | .318

THE BASE RUNNING RECORD.

Those of the League championship players who are credited with not less
than 50 stolen bases in the pennant race, are as follows:

BASERUNNERS.|CLUB. |Games.|Stolen Bases.
------------+------------+------+-----------
Hoy |Washington | 136 | 82
Seery |Indianapolis| 133 | 80
Sunday |Pittsburg | 119 | 71
Pfeffer |Chicago | 136 | 64
Ryan |Chicago | 130 | 60
Fogarty |Philadelphia| 120 | 58
Kelly |Boston | 105 | 56
Ewing |New York | 103 | 53
Tiernan |New York | 113 | 52

The above are the leaders in seven of the eight League clubs. Hanlon led
in the Detroit team, but he only scored 38 stolen bases in 108 games. The
Detroit team was singularly weak in this respect.

Mr. R.M. Larner of Washington has made up an interesting table from the
figures of the League averages, which presents some very interesting
statistics of the base running in the League during the championship
season of 1888. Mr. Larner says:

"The official averages of League players contain the number of bases
stolen by each player during the season, but furnish no means of
comparison between the clubs in that most important department of the
game. A glance, however, shows that the three tail-end clubs possess the
three most successful base-runners in the League, in Hoy of the
Washingtons, Seery of Indianapolis, and Sunday of Pittsburgh, the latter
of whom would probably have finished first had an accident not prevented
him from playing during the last two weeks of the season."

The following table includes in its first column all those methods of
reaching first base, except the force-outs, which cannot be ascertained,
and would not materially affect the record, in this comparison.
Indianapolis and Washington still lead, Pittsburgh comes well to the
front, pushing the next three clubs down a peg each, and the Phillies and
Detroits keep their places at the foot:

CLUBS. |Reached 1st Base.|Stolen Bases.|Percentages.
------------+-----------------+-------------+-----------
Indianapolis| 1,589 | 350 | .220
Washington | 1,515 | 331 | .218
Pittsburg | 1,474 | 282 | .191
New York | 1,772 | 315 | .178
Boston | 1,719 | 292 | .170
Chicago | 1,720 | 285 | .166
Philadelphia| 1,569 | 246 | .157
Detroit | 1,843 | 193 | .105

Mr. Larner says. "The simple total of bases stolen is misleading as to a
club's proficiency in base running, since the strong batting clubs having
more men who reach first base have more chances to steal, and hence excel
in totals, while in percentages they fall below clubs which are weaker in
batting. The true measure is the relation between the number of bases
stolen and the number of chances offered for the attempt, which is the
whole number of those who reach first base, whether on hits, balls,
errors, hits by pitcher, illegal delivery, or force-outs."